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San Sebastiano
San Trovaso
San Vio
Sant’Agnese
Santa Margherita
Santa Maria della Carita
(Accademia)
Santa Maria della Visitazione San Gerolamo dei Gesuati
Santa Marta
Santa Teresa
Le Terese
Spirito Santo

 



 

San Sebastiano
Antonio Scarpagnino 1506-48


History

The first church on this site was an oratory to
Santa Maria Assunta, founded in 1396 by the Girolamini - the order of the Hermits of Saint Jerome. It was rebuilt in 1455 and again between 1506 and 1548, when it was replaced by a bigger church also dedicated to the Virgin, but to Saint Sebastian too, in thanksgiving  for his deliverance of the local population from the plague of 1464. Both saints feature in the decoration of the church. The building of this, the current, church and its monastery saw the church's façade switched from facing the Campazzo San Sebastiano (as seen in De Barbari's map of 1500) to the current arrangement facing the canal. This work was carried out by Antonio Abbondi, known as Scarpagnino, and it was his last built church.
The church and the convent next door were suppressed in 1810 by Napoleon and the convent was partially demolished before being rebuilt in 1856. It now houses the University of Venice's department of literature and philosophy.
As you go to the Madonna dell’Orto or the Scuola di San Rocco for Tintoretto and to San Giorgio degli Schiavoni for Carpaccio, this is where you come for Paolo Veronese. It was his parish church, and doubtful tradition has it that he found refuge in the monastery after killing a love rival. He began decorating it at the age of 30, working here from 1555 to 1581. His commission came from the then prior here, Bernardo Torlioni, who was also originally from Verona. Veronese died in 1588 and was buried here - his tombstone is in the floor in front of the Lando Chapel. He was buried here with his brother Benedetto Caliari, also a painter, who helped out here, to complete the work in the nave in less than a year after Paolo's death.

The church
The façade, the final part to be completed, is dominated by the two pairs of Corinthian columns at the ends on each level, which support a large tympanum with statues of Saint Jerome, Saint Catherine of Alexandria and, in the middle, Saint Sebastian.

The interior and art
An aisleless nave with an atrium at the back with a barco (nuns' gallery) above, which continues over the three nave altars on each side. Almost all of the decoration of the interior is the work of Veronese and his studio - the paintings around the choir and on the ceiling and the organ doors, the frescoed walls, featuring figures and architecture, and the sacristy, which is earlier work.
The nave ceiling, begun in 1556, directly after he finished in the sacristy, shows scenes from the Life of Esther, and on the gallery walls the Trial and Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian. The central panel of The Coronation of Esther (see right) echoes the Coronation of the Virgin panel that Veronese had painted for the sacristy the year before, Esther being seen as the Old Testament prototype of Mary. Restoration of these panels took place in the Abbazia della Misericordia, next to Santa Maria Valverde from 2008. The trompe l'oeil painting here blends unnervingly smoothly with the actual architecture, which had been finished only a few years before. You get the impression that the church was built specifically to house the trompe l'oeil vistas and the combination of art, sculpture and architecture is all-over seamless. Veronese had trained as a stonecutter too, that being his father's profession, and designed the altar, along with the organ and the choir stalls.
The high altarpiece was commissioned from Veronese by the Cornaro family, including Caterina. It depicts Saints Sebastian with Saints John the Baptist, Francis, Peter, Elizabeth, Catherine and the Madonna in Glory with Musician Angels. Ridolfi says that Saint Francis is a portrait of Veronese's patron here, Bernardo Torlioni. On the side walls of the sanctuary are panels of Saints Mark and Marcellian Led to Martyrdom and The Martyrdom of of Saint Sebastian, said to have been painted by Veronese to replace damaged frescoes of the same subjects.
There's also a smoky late Saint Nicholas of Bari by Titian, painted when he was 86, on the right behind the cash desk  as you enter. And there are works by Palma Giovane and an 18th century painter called Federico Bencovich.

The sacristy
Through a door on the left under the organ, contains Veronese's first work here from 1555. His canvas ceiling panels depict the Coronation of the Virgin in the centre, with four ovals depicting the Four Evangelists surrounding it. There are putti in the four tondi at the corners (said by Ridolfi to be the work of pupils), and painting onto the woodwork of the ceiling, depicting Old Testament scenes, that have lasted less well than the canvas panels. Before he began there were already works here by artists from Verona of an earlier generation, including
a Crucifixion by Domenico Brusasorci and works by Bonifacio de' Pitati.

Lost art
Veronese's fresco of The Assumption in the sanctuary dome, with supporting Fathers of the Church in the pendentives, were all lost when the damaged surface was repaired in the early 18th century.
Also
Veronese's early and very long The Feast at the House of Simon of c. 1570 from the refectory of the convent here, looted by Napoleon and now in the Brera Gallery in Milan, the city which Napoleon intended to make the capital of his new Kingdom of Italy, primarily to annoy the Venetians.
Odd details include Mary Mag washing Christ's feet above a broken cup and a large cat fighting two dogs in the foreground. Veronese also designed the benches in the refectory, which are now lost.

Campanile

Free-standing and built between 4th March 1544 and 21st May 1546 (the plaque at the base tells us) also by Scarpagnino. It originally had a cone-shaped spire with coloured glazed tiles.

The church in literature
Robert Coover's Pinocchio in Venice has a chapter where our hero (much aged) takes refuge here (unnamed but recognisable) where he ponders on Veronese, Saint Sebastian, voluptuous American tourists, etc.

Ruskin said
The tomb, and of old the monument, of Paul Veronese. It is full of his noblest pictures, or of what once were such; but they seemed to me for the most part destroyed by repainting. I had not time to examine them justly, but I would especially direct the traveller's attention to the small Madonna over the second altar on the right of the nave, still a perfect and priceless treasure.

Opening times
Monday to Saturday: 10.30 to 4.30
Sundays: closed
A Chorus Church

Scaffolding update July 2018 Things seemed to have been improving, but the interior of San Sebastiano is like a building site again. Save Venice's work seems to be neverending -  it's been going on for more than a decade now - and sudden closures are also now not unusual.

Vaporetto
San Basilio

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San Trovaso
Francesco Smeraldi 1584-1657


History
Trovaso is a Venetian blending of three saints: Gervase and Protase, twin brothers and martyrs from Milan who were also the sons of martyrs (Vitale and Valeria) and Chrysogonus, an ancient Roman martyred in Aquila. The 10th-century church was rebuilt by the Barbarigo and Caravella families in 1028 and again after the fire of 1105. The nave of this building collapsed on 11th September 1583, with work on the present church beginning the following year, probably to a design by Francesco Smeraldi, a pupil of Palladio, although sometimes Palladio himself is credited with the design, which is unlikely as he had died 3 years before the collapse. Consecration followed in 1657. There was hefty restoration work in the 19th century, especially to the altars. Further work, mostly on the roof, was carried out in 1987.

The church

The building has two identical façades (modelled on Le Zitelle on Giudecca). This duplication was so that the two rival local factions, the Nicolotti and Castellani, could each have an entrance of equal importance. The Castellani were named after the district of  San Pietro di Castello, whilst the Nicolotti were named after San Nicolò di Mendicoli. Hence the Nicoletti used the west door, facing the campo, and the Castellani the south, facing the canal. Even foreigners acquired an allegiance depending on where they first arrived in Venice. So arriving at San Marco by boat, for example, makes you a Castellani, whereas coming in at the railway station means you're a Nicolotti.

Interior
A Latin cross with six chapels along the nave. For such an out-of-the-way church the size is what impresses - the previous church which collapsed would've fitted along the current transept. The net curtains in the clerestory windows and the cheesy piped new-age music were memorable too, but for the wrong reasons.

Art highlights
In Tintoretto's The Temptation of Saint Anthony, in the left transept in the Milledonne Chapel, you might notice a woman who 'might be taken for a very respectable person, but that there are flames playing around her loins' as Ruskin put it (she's on the right). The Chapel of the Sacrament, which faces the entrance to the canal side, has a very restored Tintoretto Last Supper facing a copy of his Christ Washing the Feet.
A panel by Michele Giambono shows San Crisogono (Saint Chrysogonus), one of the church's dedicatory saints (see right). It was restored in 1974, and again in 2015/16.  A drawing for it is in the Met in New York we are told, but it looks like a totally different horse to me.
Giambono was also a mosaicist whose work can be seen in San Marco.

Lost art
Christ Washing the Feet of the Disciples by Tintoretto, painted for the Chapel of the Sacrament here, is now in the National Gallery in London. It's original purchaser, after it left San Trovaso, was Sir Joshua Reynolds. A late Bellini Virgin and Child was reported as being here in the early 20th century too.

The church in art
Boat-building, Venice, a watercolour by Sir Henry Rushbury in a private collection, has San Trovaso looming picturesquely behind the even more picturesque boatyard.

Campanile
53m (172ft) manual bells

The Merian map of 1635 (see detail right) shows a tower without the octagonal drum on top.

Opening times
Monday to Saturday:
8.00-11.00, 3.00-6.00

Vaporetto Zattere

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San Vio
Giovanni Pividor 1865
 


History
The original church of San Vio (dedicated to Saint Vitus
and his partner in martyrdom Saont Modestus) was built in 912 by the Vido and Balbi families. It was rebuilt in the five years following Bajamonte Tiepolo's unsuccessful conspiracy against the republic on the 15th June 1310, using masonry from Tiepolo's demolished palazzo at Sant'Agostin - the door to the palazzo becoming the door to the church (see print left). The doge and signoria would visit the church annually on that day, which is also Saint Vitus's day, to commemorate Tiepolo's defeat. In 1354 the small campo in front of the church was extended down to the Grand Canal, by demolishing the Tagliapetra palazzo, so that the dignitaries would have a grander approach.
The church had seven altars, under one of which was placed the miraculously preserved (and miracle-working) body of the Contessa Tagliapetra. The was a cupola with frescoes by Girolamo Brusaferro and altarpieces that were school-of Veronese and Giovanni Bellini. Restoration work in 1745 found the floor of the original church, 8ft below the then floor level.

The church was closed in 1808 and declared dangerous and demolished in July 1813. Fragments from the church were used in the building of the current oratory which was built nearby by Gaspare Biondetti Crovato, to a design by Giovanni Pividor and opened in 1865. Fragments from the house of Bajamonte Tiepolo were reused again, around the door. It is now a private residence, belonging to one Piero Pinto at last report, and closed to the public.

Rosalba Carriera's tomb
The original church was the burial place of painter Rosalba Carriera and her sister Giovanna, who both lived nearby. The oratory had a stone plaque on the wall engraved with the words Rosalba Carriera Pittrice 1757 but this is now gone.

Vaporetto
Accademia

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Sant’Agnese
12th century
 


History
Founded perhaps in the 10th century, this church was first mentioned in a document of 1081. It was rebuilt after a fire in 1105
, but much of the original nave's brickwork remains. Reconsecrated in 1321, with interior decoration work in 1604 and 1670 by Lodovico Bruzzoni, and more restoration work in 1733.  Suppression by the French followed in 1810 and the church was stripped of its art and furnishings. After a time being used as a warehouse for firewood and coal the church was acquired in 1839 by Antonangelo and Marcantonio Cavanis. Restoration work on the interior and façade followed and the church reopened in 1872 as an oratory for the nearby Educational Institute of the Cavanis. More restoration work in 1939.

Art highlight
Reportedly the only remaining art of note a Guardian Angel by Lattanzio Querena.

Lost art
The Coronation of the Virgin by Michele Giambono (see right), now in the Accademia, was commissioned in 1447 by Giovanni Dotto for the high altar here. The commission came with the stipulation that the work be based on the Coronation of the Virgin by Antonio Vivarini and Giovanni d'Alemagna in San Pantalon. One scholar has argued that this Accademia Coronation is also the work of Antonio Vivarini and Giovanni d’Alemagna and not Giambono's work for this church at all. Giambono also designed mosaics - he signed the mosaic of the Presentation of Mary in the Temple in the Mascoli chapel  in San Marco, amongst other scenes from the life of the Virgin, the creation of which he was also involved with.

Campanile
Was also 12th-century (see map below) but demolished in 1837-38. The lower part still stands, though,  topped by a three-arched bell tower.

Opening times

Vaporetto Zattere

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A detail from the map from 1635 showing Sant'Agnese (to left and below centre) before the canal in front of it was filled in.
On the opposite side of the canal the Gesuati hasn't been built yet. And below right is the old church of San Vio.

Santa Margherita
Giovanni Battista Lambranzi  17th century
 


History
One of the oldest churches in Venice, originally built by a merchant called Geniano Busignaco in 836 and consecrated  in 853, during the reign of doge Pietro Tradonico. The first certain documentation for this first church is 1108. It was said to have been a three-aisled basilica with a gold-covered apse of mosaics and to have had a dome supported by four marble columns. By the time of De Barbari's map there is no dome.
The current church dates from the 1687 rebuilding by Giovanni Battista Lambranzi, the parish priest, also responsible for the nearby, and similarly plain-fronted, church of Le Eremite. Saint Margaret of Antioch was a saint very popular in the East, as was Saint Pantaleon who also has a church very nearby, which suggests that this area was once popular with Byzantine merchants.
The church was suppressed in 1808, becoming a tobacco factory and then a storehouse for marble from the other suppressed churches. From 1882 the building was used as a Protestant church, then the studio of sculptor Luigi Borro, and then a cinema. In the early 1990s it was converted by architect Luciano Gemin into a lecture hall for Venice University's architecture faculty. Peering through the door you'll see a plain space with the look of a conference centre, the pews having been replaced by rows of stacking chairs. But interior photos show considerable conversion to a theatre (see right), and that the ceiling painting The Martyrdom of Saint Margaret, attributed to Antonio Zanchi, is still in place. Various carvings from the church have been set into the campanile stump and the walls of the adjacent house.

Campanile

In 1808 the upper part of the campanile was demolished as it was unsafe, leaving a 46ft stump for use as a house. The painting below, by Gabriel Bella, shows the campanile intact in the late-18th century, but looking a bit wonky.

Lost art
Three paintings - a Last Supper, The Washing of the Feet and Agony in the Garden - painted by Tintoretto for this church are now in Santo Stefano.

The church in art
There's a chalk and pastel drawing by Whistler of the Campanile Santa Margherita in the Addison Gallery of American Art.

Vaproretto
Ca' Rezzonico

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Santa Maria della Carità (Accademia)
1441-52
 


History
The first documented church and convent on this site were founded in 1134 by an Augustinian order of friars from Ravenna, although it is said there was a wooden church on the site before this, erected to house a miracle-working Madonna. The 12th-century church was consecrated by Pope Alexander II on April 5th 1177, following the six months he spent hiding in the convent here from Frederick Barbarossa. In 1260 the buildings passed to the Scuola Grande di Santa Maria della Carità, which was originally a flagellant confraternity, like all six of the original Scuole Grande, and had been established in 1260 in the church of San Leonardo in Cannaregio. The church at this time had an external portico, once a common feature in Venice but the only two remaining are at San Nicolò dei Mendicoli and San Giacomo di Rialto.
A guildhall was built beside the convent in 1344, followed in 1441-52 by a larger Gothic church overseen, and with stonework, by Bartolomeo Bon. The 12th-century convent was rebuilt from 1561 to designs by Palladio, but most of his work was destroyed in a fire of 1630. The order was suppressed in 1768 and following the church's suppression, and partial demolition, in 1807 it was decided that the whole complex was to be converted into a home for the Venetian Academy. Work began in 1811, headed by Giannantonio Selva, and the gallery opened in 1817. The Gothic church was treated much worse than the then more fashionable Palladian monastery elements - it was stripped of all decoration during this work, the barco and chapels were destroyed, the windows walled over, and the space divided in two horizontally. Some of this work was reversed in the mid/late -20th century.

Campanile
Visible in both of the Canaletto paintings mentioned below. It dated to the building of the original church, but suddenly collapsed on March 17th 1741. It fell towards the Grand Canal so it didn't  damage the church, but it did demolish two houses and the splash washed two traghetti into Campo San Vidal opposite.

Lost art
Works by the Vivarini, an altarpiece painted around 1468 by Giovanni Bellini, and four triptychs, with lunettes, until recently said to be by Giovanni, but which have recently been more strongly argued as by Jacopo Bellini and assistants, but the degree of Giovanni's involvement is still argued. They were all originally along the wall under the barco in the church but are now in the Accademia, displayed in the space corresponding to the apse of the Carità church.
A Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist, a very early and Mantagna-looking panel by Giovanni Bellini, is in the Louvre. It is thought to have been in the chapel of Saint John the Evangelist, to the left of the high altar here. It is associated with a predella showing Stories of Saint John the Evangelist and Drusiana is in the Schloss Berchtesgaden in Munich.
Also in the Accademia is Cima da Conegliano's Virgin and Child Enthroned with Six Saints (Catherine, George and Nicholas (left) and Anthony Abbot, Sebastian and Lucy) from the late 1490s. It also features two angel musicians and Cima's characteristic putto-heads in clouds. It was commissioned by Giorgio Dragan, a Venetian ship-owner, for his family chapel here. It was restored in 2005, the work involving the removing of grimy varnish and old repainting and retouching holes caused by termite infestation.
The tomb of Doge Nicolò da Ponte, who died in 1585, was designed by Daniele Barbaro and finished by Scamozzi, but was destroyed. Fragments of the tombs of doges Marco and Agostino Barbarigo, attributed to Codussi,  are now to be found in the Ca d'Oro.
A late-15th-century bronze statue of Christ the Redeemer by an unknown Venetian sculptor, commissioned by goldsmith Domenico di Piero and originally in the Saviour Chapel here, is now in the Museo Poldi Pezzoli in Milan.

The church in art
Canaletto's Grand Canal from Santa Maria della Carità to the Bacino di San Marco (see right). Also to be seen in the background of his Stonemason's yard in the National Gallery in London.
A 16th-century painting of Doge Sebastiano Ziani meets Pope Alexander III at the church of Santa Maria della Carità (now in the Accademia) shows the façades of the church and scuola as they would have appeared in the mid-16th century.

Ruskin wrote
Once an interesting Gothic church of the fourteenth century, lately defaced, and applied to some of the usual important purposes of the modern Italians. The effect of its ancient façade may partly be guessed at from the picture of Canaletto, but only guessed at; Canaletto being less to be trusted for renderings of details, than the rudest and most ignorant painter of the thirteenth century.

The Scuola
has its own entry now.

Opening times
Monday 8.15-2.00
Tuesday-Sunday 8.15-6.15

Vaporetto Accademia

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Santa Maria della Visitazione
1493-1524
 


History
Built by the Gesuati order, to replace an oratory dating from their arrival in Venice in 1390, this church is said to have been designed by Tullio Lombardo or Mauro Codussi. Building work began in 1493 with consecration coming in 1524. When the larger Gesuati church was built this church was converted into a library by Massari, in 1750.
Suppressed in 1810, the church was reopened in 1825 and restored in 1884, and than again in 1947-8. The church is now
the chapel of the Istituto Don Orione which has taken over the Gesuati's monastery complex. The complex had been an orphanage from suppression until Don Orione's purchase in 1923, and had been known then as San Nicolò degli Orfani. Orphans continued to be taught there until 1980 when the monastery became student accommodation. In the 1990s part of the complex was converted to 'religious boarding'.

The church
The lovely Lombardesque façade is probably the source of the
Lombardo/Codussi attribution. The statues on top, The Saviour and Two Saints, are contemporary with the façade. There is a bocca del leone, a lion's mouth, to the right of the church where anonymous accusations could be posted. This one was for the Magistrati della Sanita (sanitation department)

Interior
A plain aisleless nave designed by Francesco da Mandello with a blind cupola and a choir. The ceiling is flat and coffered with painted panels. There are a pair of side altars at the apse end, both contain paintings that look neither old nor good.  The Corinthian columns around the entrance were salvaged from the demolished oratory.

Art highlights
When it was suppressed by Napoleon it was stripped of its art except for the coffered ceiling whose 58 compartments contain portraits of saints and prophets. These are attributed to the Umbrian painter Pier Paolo Agabiti. This ceiling was found to be in need of restoration and work was due to begin in 1970. It was finally restored in the mid-1990s by
Venice in Peril, following a long dispute over ownership of the building which held up the work and resulted in further deterioration.

Lost art

A Tintoretto Crucifixion, now in the Gesuati.

Opening times
Tuesday to Thursday 10.15-12.00am, 3.00-5.00pm
Saturday and Sunday 10.15-1.00pm, 2.00-5.00pm
€3 entrance fee.
But this information may be unreliable, as I found the church closed, with no posted times, in March 2017.

Vaporetto Zattere

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Santa Marta
15th century


History

A church, with a convent and a hospital, was founded here in 1316 by Giacomina Scorpioni from the Benedictine convent of San Lorenzo d'Ammiana. Between 1460 and 1480 it was rebuilt. In the 16th century the complex passed to Augustinian nuns.
Following suppression in 1805, and the demolition of the monastic buildings, it was used by the army to store animal fodder, then as a railway company warehouse in the 20th century when it still had its partly restored 'ancient roof of sprung beams', according to Lorenzetti.
The church is now a very clean brick box in between a road and a dockside car park. It seems to have had all the life scrubbed off the exterior, leaving nice warm-coloured brickwork but very little character. It is now sometimes used as a Biennale venue.

Lost art
A bas relief of Santa Marta surrounded by nuns which was taken from above the door here is now in Angelo Raffaele, and another from the door of the convent went to Sant'Eufemia over on Giudecca.
An exuberant reliquary (see right) made for the convent here, which contained the hand of Santa Marta, is now in the Louvre. It was commissioned in 1472 by the then abbess Orsa Zorgi from the silversmith Giovanni Leon, known in his native Germany as Hans Löwe.

Campanile
Demolished in 1910. The de' Barbari map (see right) shows a tower topped by a conical spire with four pinnacles, as does the postcard (see far right). In the Canaletto night painting mentioned below the campanile has a dome.


Local colour
A famous fair, celebrated on the eve the Feast of Saint Martha in August, involved fishermen roasting sfogi (flatfish) on the beach, dancing, and the mingling of the classes. There is a Canaletto painting of this fair, La Vigilia di Santa Marta, in the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin (see the hastily-snapped dark detail photo right). It is one of only two known Canaletto night-views, the other being La Vigilia di San Pietro,
also in the same gallery.



Opening times Closed (but sometimes
used as a theatre venue and/or art gallery during the Biennale.)

Vaporetto
Santa Marta

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A photo taken in 1934.

 





 

Santa Teresa
Andrea Cominelli 1688
 


History
The church and convent here were built in the late 17th century by Andrea Cominelli (who had worked with Longhena) for the Sisters of Saint Theresa and consecrated in 1688.  The convent (to the left of the church) was suppressed in 1810 and became an orphanage. In the 20th century it was used as a hostel for homeless people and a nursery school. It is now home to the faculty of arts and design of the The University of Venice.

Interior
Tall and square, simple but imposing. Used to (and may still) contain a fine range of 17th-century art. These works included a Madonna and Saints by Guarana, Saint Teresa in Glory by Ranieri and Christ Crucified and the Magdalene by the Genoese painter G. B. Langetti. The latter was restored in 1949 and moved to the Ca'Rezzonico.

Lost art
A 1663 Saint Michael with Saints by Fra' Massino da Verona, from an altar to the right of the presbytery here, is in the Sant’Apollonia Diocesan Museum of Sacred Art

The church in film
Santa Teresa is seen (looking badly in need of a coat of plaster) in a shot of Donald Sutherland walking to San Nicolo dei Mendicoli, the church he is restoring, in Don’t Look Now.

Opening times
The church is 'closed for restoration', and has been for many years.

Vaporetto San Basilio

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An old interior photo from Franzoi and Di Stefano (see Sources).

 

Spirito Santo
Antonio Abbondi 1506


History
The church and its Augustinian convent were founded in 1483 by Maria Caroldo and rebuilt in 1506 to a design by Antonio Abbondi (known as Lo Scarpagnino). The Scuola to the right of the church (with a façade looking very similar but less squashed) was also added in 1506. In 1520 the Zattere fondamenta was built and the old church's apse was demolished. As a result the orientation was reversed and the present Lombardesque façade built. It was finished in 1524 by Giacomo de Bernardis, under Scarpagnino's supervision. It was here that the murderers of Lorenzino de'Medici took refuge after attacking him outside the church of San Polo in 1548. Suppressed in 1806, but reopened a few years later. The Scuola became a tobacco warehouse and is now a private residence.

The interior
The interior is said to be be very redolent of two hundred years of restoration, with an aisle-less nave, 17th-century altars, and a baroque high altar with Solomonic columns. The inner façade is taken up with a funerary monument to Paolo Paruta, an historian of the Venetian Republic, said to be by Longhena and built around 1651. His son and brother are buried here too.

Art highlights
The church is said to contain altarpieces by Buonconsiglio, Guarana, Jacopo Bassano and Palma il Giovanne, mostly from other closed churches. But given that the much more obscure painting mentioned below is now in the Accademia, I doubt that these works are still to be found here.

Lost art
The Pentecost by Polidoro da Lanciano, an assistant to Titian, now in the
Accademia.

The church in art
Five watercolours
by John Singer Sargent 1902-4 and one by his sister. This watercolour (see right) was once owned by William James, the son of William Sr and nephew of Henry, it having been given to him by Sargent's sister.

The church in fiction
In Vengeance in Venice Philip Gwynne Jones' hero, Nathan the Honorary Consul, gets off at the Spirito Santo vaporetto stop and observes of the church 'its doors hadn't opened in over a century. Rumours persisted that some works of art remained inside, leading to occasional break-ins, but the official line was that everything of value had long since been removed to the Accademia...there was supposedly nothing of interest to see inside and the structure was in poor condition, leaving it useless even as a temporary space for the Biennale'

Opening times
Always closed

Vaporetto Zattere

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